Books of the Year 2014: Part 2

Cover imageLooking back over the year for these three posts it seems that many of my favourite reads were crammed into the first two months of the year. March, however, saw only one, Shot gun Lovesongs, but that may well turn out to be my book of the year. Nickolas Butler’s American smalltown gem is a gorgeous, tender novel which retains enough grittiness to steer well clear of the sentimental while wringing your heart. I hope there’ll be another Butler on the horizon soon.

After the remarkable Burnt Shadows I had been looking forward to April’s A God in Every Stone by Kamila Shamsie as soon as I spotted it in the publishing schedules and it didn’t disappoint. Shamsie takes complex universal themes and humanises them through the lives, loves and passions of her characters. It’s a towering achievement as is Look Who’s Back in an entirely different way. Timur Vermes’ very funny satire sees Hitler waking up with a terrible headache in August 2011, more than a little bemused but soon all too plausibly back in the frame. Satire can go horribly wrong but Vermes is right on the button. Not surprisingly, it caused a bit of a stir in Germany when it was published, storming up the bestseller charts and staying there for seventy weeks.

Having started this with a prime candidate for my book of the year, I spotted another inWith a Zero at its Heart May’s posts. With its unusual thematic structure Charles Lambert’s With A Zero at its Heart could have been too tricksy for its own good but instead it turned out to be one of the finest books I’ve read this year. Its beauty lies in Lambert’s language – his skewering of a particular sentiment with a pithy phrase, his evocation of an experience in a few striking words. Also in May was Louisa Young’s sequel to the heartrending My Dear I Wanted to Tell YouThe Heroes’ Welcome. Young’s sympathetic characterisation draws you immediately into this powerful novel which looks at the aftermath of war, deftly avoiding all sentimentality. You don’t have to have read My Dear I Wanted to Tell You to enjoy The Heroes’ Welcome but you’d be missing a treat if you didn’t.

cover imageNothing in June or July but in August I was reminded of my bookselling days by Andy Miller who I’d worked with briefly at Waterstone’s head office many years ago when the apostrophe was present and correct. The Year of Reading Dangerously in which Andy gets his reading mojo back is touching, honest and very funny indeed. Lots of sniggering in this house, and not just me. You might think ‘she would say that wouldn’t she’ but if Twitter’s anything to go by Andy seems to be having a lot of success helping people rediscover their inner reader. I’m going to leave you with another August title: The Miniaturist. Might as well get all my book of the year contenders into one post. Set in seventeenth-century Amsterdam, it was inspired by. Petronella Oortman’s cabinet house in the Rijksmuseum. I’m sure you can’t have failed to notice all the brouhaha around it but believe me, it’s justified. It’s a love story, a mystery, a portrait of a great city in which greed, betrayal and corruption seethe beneath a pious Calvinist surface – altogether a very fine book indeed. I’ll leave you with that. Third post to follow soon and if you missed the first you can catch up here.

8 thoughts on “Books of the Year 2014: Part 2

  1. crimeworm

    I do fancy The Year Of Reading Dangerously and The Miniaturist…mind you, my TBR pile(s) are already teetering (metaphorically, when it comes to the Kindle; literally when it comes to the house…) Actually, I think I heard this year somewhere they’d a@ltered the meaning of literally…which is v annoying, if true…all those people who misuse it as a word for emphasis -well, it drives me mad. Metaphorically of course!

    Reply
    1. Susan Osborne Post author

      They did, indeed! A little mindboggling when you hear people using the expression ‘literally on another planet’ or some such phrase.

      Reply
    1. Susan Osborne Post author

      Shotgun Lovesongs is wonderful, Helen. Need your tissues to hand for that one but Andy Miller will cheer you up!

      Reply
  2. litlove

    Still making lists here… have duly noted these down. I absolutely must read The Year of Reading Dangerously, and I’m curious about the Kamila Shamsie too.

    Reply
    1. Susan Osborne Post author

      Just one more post to go on Friday. Hope you’ll find something to take your fancy on that one, too.

      Reply

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