Tag Archives: Chibundu Onuzo

Paperbacks to Look Out for in August 2017: Part Two

Cover imageThis second batch of August paperbacks kicks off in New York with a surefire bestseller then wanders into smalltown America before briefly taking off around the world, offering a few more out-of-the-way books to explore. Emma Flint’s Little Deaths takes a crime committed in 1960s New York and fashions it into a novel which I’m pretty sure will turn up on a quite a few beaches this summer. In the heat wave of 1965, Ruth Malone wakes to find both her children are missing. Paying more attention to the wagging tongues keen to emphasise Ruth’s colourful life then they perhaps should, the police jump to conclusions but a tabloid journalist new to the job thinks otherwise. Crime fiction isn’t my usual territory but the setting and premise of this one makes me curious.

Anna Quindlen’s Miller’s Valley takes us out of the city and into smalltown America, a favourite setting for me. Looking back on her life spent in Miller’s Valley, the town her family have lived in for generations, Mimi Miller ‘confronts the toxicity of secrets, the dangers of gossip, the flaws of marriage, the risks and inequalities of friendship, loyalty and passion. Home, she acknowledges, is somewhere it’s just as easy to feel lost as contented’ according to the publishers who raise the bar extraordinarily high by comparing the novel with Elizabeth Strout’s Olive Kitteridge. I’m a Cover imagefan of Quindlen’s fiction so expectations are high, but perhaps not that high.

Gregoire Delacourt’s novels are often written in a delightfully playful style yet deliver acute observations. His last novel, The First Thing You See, took a mischievous swipe at celebrity culture all wrapped up in a sweet love story but We Saw Only Happiness sounds much more sombre. Antoine is determined that his son and daughter will have the perfect childhood, a far cry from his own. He’s convinced he’s found the secret of a happy life but tragic circumstances turn him into someone he no longer recognises. This may not sound a particularly inspiring premise but I’ve enjoyed all the novels by Delacourt I’ve read so far.

Enrique Vila-Matas’ The Illogic of Kassel sounds entirely different. A writer is invited to take part in Documenta, a contemporary art exhibition held in the German town of Kassel every five years. All he has to do is to write every morning in a Chinese restaurant on the outskirts of town. ‘Once in Kassel, the writer is surprised to find himself overcome by good cheer. As he strolls through the city, spurred on by his spontaneous, quirky response to art, he begins to make sense of the wonders that surround him’ say the publishers. Paul Auster’s recommendation is the lure for me here.

Cover imageI’m not sure what Auster would think of it but I’ve seen lots of recommendations from bloggers for my final choice. Chibundu Onuzo’s Welcome to Lagos is about five runaways who’ve left their home for the metropolis in search of a better life. They’re a disparate bunch made up of a private, a housewife, an officer, a militant and a young girl. ‘Soon, they will also share a burden none of them expected, but for now, the five sit quietly with their hopes, as the billboards fly past and shout: Welcome to Lagos’ according to the publishers.

That’s it for August. A click on a title will take you to a more detailed synopsis for anything that’s caught your eye. If you’d like to catch up with either August’s new titles or the first batch of paperbacks, they’re here and here.