Monte Carlo by Peter Terrin (translated by David Doherty): Sliding into obsession and madness

Cover image‘Check ignition and may God’s love be with you’ is the achingly familiar quote which prefaces Peter Terrin’s novella. It might be tempting to think that Monte Carlo was written after David Bowie’s death last year but it was originally published in Holland in 2014. Sometimes it’s a struggle to work out quite why an author has chosen a particular epigraph for their novel but in this case it couldn’t be more appropriate. Ending on the night of the first moon landing in 1969, Terrin’s novel tells the tale of a God-fearing mechanic who becomes obsessed with the actress whose life he saves.

Jack Preston is the chief mechanic of Sutton’s Formula One team. It’s the job he’s worked towards since he was thirteen, losing himself in tinkering with a local farmer’s Massey Ferguson two years after the death of his father. Jack and his team are readying themselves for the start of the 1968 Grand Prix but the crowd only has eyes for DeeDee, the young, delicately beautiful movie actress who has captured everyone’s hearts including that of the Prince whose wife was once a starlet. As DeeDee walks towards him, Jack catches the scent of fuel on the air, leaping towards her just in time to save her from a conflagration. DeeDee’s bodyguard drags them both away from the flames – DeeDee unscathed but Jack badly burnt. As Jack lies in hospital, a journalist comes to interview him, his answers haltingly translated by his nurse with her sketchy grasp of English. Jack arrives home a hero, not least to his wife, but as the year passes with no word from DeeDee, no acknowledgment of his sacrifice, Jack’s obsession with her deepens until, as the villagers’ admiration leaks away, he slides into madness.

From its vividly dramatic opening, this beautiful dreamlike novella had me in its grip. The first section is a cinematic intersplicing of images from the racetrack before the focus is switched to Jack and the aftermath of his dramatic rescue. Terrin’s writing is strikingly arresting: ‘Sunlight streams in through the vast windows of the reception area, reflected by the distant azure of the sea with a brilliance that verges on the audible’; ’A roar of laughter from the fat man punches a hole in the dignified serenity of the grandstand’. Jack’s increasingly delusional obsession is chillingly convincing, offset by the odd flash of humour. There’s a contemporary resonance in the portrayal of celebrity although DeeDee put me in mind of Princess Diana, several decades after the events portrayed in the novel. From the fragmentary structure which suits the novel beautifully to its oblique ending, this is a meticulously crafted piece of fiction. Terrin’s written four novels besides this one but it appears that only The Guard has been translated. Let’s hope MacLehose Press have plans to publish the other three.

10 thoughts on “Monte Carlo by Peter Terrin (translated by David Doherty): Sliding into obsession and madness

  1. Annabel (gaskella)

    I’ve just read this too. It’s gone straight onto my books of the year list – I loved it.

    I went to Monte Carlo some years ago as they were putting up the grandstands for the Grand Prix and it was so exciting to be driven around the circuit – I took photos all the way around – to be scanned for my own review I think.

    Reply
      1. Susan Osborne Post author

        Thank you! It is, Cathy. Beautiful dreamlike writing with some lovely sly humour now and again. I’d echo Annabel’s comment, one of the best books I’ve read this year.

        Reply
  2. 1streading

    I enjoyed The Guard – this sounds different but also interesting, particularly its portrayal of celebrity. I think one other Terrin novel has been translated – Post Mortem.

    Reply
    1. Susan Osborne Post author

      Yes, the publishers mentioned Post Mortem after I posted the review. Both books are now on my list. I thought the writing in Monte Carlo was quite remarkable.

      Reply

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