Tag Archives: Lisa Moore

The Last Book of the Year

At the beginning of 2014 I wrote one of those posts that I thought was just for my own satisfaction but which generated some interesting discussion. It was called ‘the first book of the year’ and it covered a decade of reading, all neatly recorded in a notebook that I still keep. I know we’re not yet done with 2015 but it’s a safe bet that I won’t finish another book before we are so I thought I’d write a counterpart. That first post was also a test of what I remembered about each book. So, two years further into middle-aged memory syndrome – that ‘what did I come into the kitchen for?’ state that will be all too familiar to some of you – here are a decade’s worth of my last books of the year.

Cover image2006: The Night Country by Stewart O’Nan And I’m off to a bad start here. I’m sorry to tell you that I remember little or nothing about O’Nan’s novel, although I know that it had supernatural overtones leaning towards horror. I’ve a feeling I read this in preparation for some magazine work as it hardly seems up my usual alley.

2007: Death of a Murderer by Rupert Thomson I read this because I’m a Thomson fan. No one could accuse him of endlessly ploughing the same furrow: this year’s Katherine Carlyle leapt into the twenty-first century after Secrecy‘s exploration of Medici court politics. I remember that the eponymous murderer was Myra Hindley, one of the infamous Moors Murderers, who had died several years before.

2008: Notes from an Exhibition by Patrick Gale This one’s easy. It was one of those titles that Richard and Judy made into a bestseller, naming it as one of their book club choices in the days when that meant shifting shed loads of books for booksellers. It’s about an artist, as its title suggests, whose death uncovers many secrets the revelation of which rock her family. Having been a Gale fan since The Aerodynamics of Pork way back when, it was a delight to see it race up the bestseller charts.

2009: First Among Sequels by Jasper Fforde I’m going to forgive myself for forgetting which particular Fforde this is. They’re very funny – the kind of books that irritate your partner as you snigger your way through them – but instantly forgettable.

2010: A Single Man by Christopher IsherwoodCover image Unusually for me these days, this was a re-read prompted by Tom Ford’s beautiful film. Set in the early ‘60s, it’s the story of a gay English professor teaching in California, left devastated by the death of his lover whose family shut him out, sweeping their relationship neatly under the carpet.

2011: A Visit from the Good Squad by Jennifer Egan I feel I should remember this in great detail – I enjoyed it very much at the time and it isn’t that long ago – but all that comes to mind is that it involved two characters from the music industry who worked together, and that it wandered about all over the world.

2012: Alligator by Lisa Moore Same goes for Lisa Moore’s Alligator which I read having enjoyed February so much. Surprisingly that’s the one I remember despite reading it several years before. It’s the story of a woman widowed while pregnant when her husband’s oil rig sinks, and her long slow emergence from grief. As for Alligator, well I’m not at all sure…

2013: Wild Hares and Humming Birds by Stephen Moss Not a novel, Wild Hares.. was a birthday present, given to me because of a newly awakened interest in nature writing. It’s a year of the Moss’s reflections on what he saw around him on the Somerset Levels, not a million miles away from where I live. I’d love to tell you that we, in the West Country, are beset by humming birds but the title refers to the hummingbird hawk-moth, which I remember seeing once at Abbotsbury Gardens.

2014: Blood, Bones and Butter by Gabrielle Hamilton Also not a novel, this is chef Gabrielle Hamilton’s memoir. I remember it for its gorgeous descriptions of food and the many places that Hamilton has eaten and cooked it with friends and family. It’s a glorious celebration of all those things – I’m tempted to use that tired old cliché ‘life-affirming’ to describe it.

2015: We Need New Names by NoViolet Bulawayo This seems an appropriate last book for this year given Naomi over at The Writes of Women and Dan’s Twitter initiative #DiverseDecember, now extended to #ReadDiverse2016. Bulawayo’s novel is set in Zimbabwe against the backdrop of Robert Mugabe’s destruction of tens of thousands of homes in 2005, seen through the eyes of ten-year-old Darling and her friends. Darling eventually joins her aunt in America only to find life there is not quite what she expected. Both funny and heart-wrenching, it’s a strikingly vivid piece of writing.

That’s my last, somewhat nerdy post of 2015. I’d love to know what your last book of the year is, present or past.

Paperbacks to Look Out For in April 2015: Part 1

Cover imageAs you can tell from the title there are so many tasty paperbacks on offer in April that I’m gong to have to spread them across two posts. Such a shame! I’ll kick off with the novel that will no doubt be top of many readers’ lists, Ali Smith’s Baileys Prize longlisted How to Be Both which alternates between the stories of a Renaissance artist and a contemporary teenager. It was described by the Goldsmith Prize judges as a book that ‘pushes the novel into thrilling new shapes’ and Jacqui’s excellent review at JacquiWine’s Journal has whetted my appetite for it even more.

Less well known but still one to look forward to, Lisa Moore’s Giller Prize shortlisted Caught follows prison escapee David Slaney who embarks on a road trip in 1978 hoping to find a new life, encountering friends, foes, undercover cops not to mention all the weather that Canada can throw at him along the way. I very much enjoyed February, Moore’s sensitive novel about the consequences of the sinking of the Ocean Ranger oil rig in 1982, so I’m looking forward to this one.

My third choice, and another Canadian one, is MiriamToews’ All My Puny Sorrows. Although I was a little underwhelmed by her much-lauded debut, A Complicated Kindness, I very much enjoyed Irma Voth so have hopes for this one which explores the painful dilemma faced by Yoli whose beloved, apparently happy and successful sister has attempted suicide. Is it time to let Elf go? Reviewers described Toews’ writing as exquisite and heart-wrenching.

Earlier this year I read Darragh McKeon’s All That is Solid Melts into Air which felt quite timely set, as it is, in Ukraine. Ten years in the writing, it’s about the catastrophic explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear plant which resulted in radioactive contamination on a horrific scale made all the more disastrous by the authorities’ attempted cover up. McKeon’s elegantly expressed novel explores the tragedy through the experiences of a doctor, his ex-wife and her child prodigy nephew. Colm Tóibín described it as ‘daring, ambitious, epic, moving’ and I won’t argue with that.

Last, but by no means least for me, is Antoine Laurain’s The Red Notebook. Laurain’s The Cover imagePresident’s Hat was one of my favourite books of 2013. The Red Notebook follows bookseller Laurent Letellier who finds an abandoned handbag containing little but the eponymous notebook. As Laurent leafs through it he becomes increasingly determined to find the woman whose jottings reveal someone he very much wants to meet but with no contact details what are his chances? If this is even half as good as The President’s Hat – and Janet’s review at From First Page to Last suggests it is – I’ll be a happy woman.

That’s the first half of April’s affordable treats. A click on the titles not linked to a review will take you to Waterstones website for a more detailed synopsis, and if you want to check out my April hardback choices here they are. My second post on April paperbacks to look out for will be up in a week or so.