Old Baggage by Lissa Evans: Votes for women, all of them

Cover imageI’d heard lots of good things about Lissa Evans’ Crooked Heart but hadn’t got around to reading it by the time Old Baggage turned up. Given that it’s a prequel I thought I’d give it a miss but Ali’s review persuaded me it could happily stand alone for which I’m very grateful. Evans’ new novel tells the story of Mattie, once met never forgotten, picking it up in 1928, ten years after British women who met a property qualification were enfranchised. For many in the women’s suffrage movement the battle’s over but not for Mattie.

Mattie lives with Florrie, affectionately known as The Flea, in the house she bought with her inheritance. Mattie and Florrie were comrades in the fight for women’s suffrage, undergoing forced feeding in Holloway, abuse from the public and brutality from the police. At the beginning of 1928, Mattie can vote but Florrie cannot. A privileged member of the upper classes, Mattie is forthright, free with her opinions and utterly determined she’s right while Florrie is tactful and quiet, a hard-working health visitor who understands poverty and deprivation at first hand. A dramatic event on Hampstead Heath brings Ida into their lives. Poor, bright and sassy with it, Ida finds herself dragooned into Mattie’s new endeavour: a club for young girls which will educate them in preparation for voting while teaching them practical skills and physical fitness, a counterpoint to a fellow veteran campaigner’s Empire Youth League which reeks of fascism. Agreeing to a competition on the Heath, Mattie is determined that the Amazons will trounce the League but an error of judgement leads to lasting repercussions.

Evans’ novel is an absolute treat. Her story romps along replete with period detail, wearing its historical veracity lightly while exploring themes of social justice with wit, humour and compassion. Set in 1928, the novel never loses sight of the fact that while some women were given the vote in 1918, the vast majority were not, nor that when they are the battle will still be far from won. Evans is a sharp, witty writer with a keen eye for characterisation. There are many very funny moments throughout her novel – most provided by Mattie, undoubtedly the star turn and at back of the queue when tact was assigned – but these are balanced with poignant moments the sweetest of which was Florrie’s congratulatory card, opened on the day of the 1929 general election, the first in which she’s able to vote. The end sets up readers who’ve not yet read Crooked Heart nicely for Mattie’s new project. I loved it. For those of us struggling with the current political climate, Old Baggage is a happy reminder that things can get better.

12 thoughts on “Old Baggage by Lissa Evans: Votes for women, all of them

  1. JacquiWine

    This does sound rather wonderful, Susan. Funnily enough, I read Evans’ Their Finest last year, a novel I really enjoyed – as with your one, the period detail was spot on. It was made into a film which you may have seen at the cinema? Anyway, I would definitely recommend the book if you’re ever looking to expand beyond these characters.

    Reply
  2. heavenali

    Great review, so delighted you enjoyed this so much. You’re right of course, the ending sets the reader up perfectly to go on to A Croooked Heart. Mattie is such a great character.

    Reply
    1. Susan Osborne Post author

      She’s so well drawn, isn’t she. I particularly liked the way that Evans handled the issue of class and women’s suffrage through Mattie and Florrie.

      Reply
  3. Kath

    I really enjoyed Crooked Heart so I’m very much looking forward to this. Besides, who doesn’t love a character with little tact who says the outrageous things we sometimes wish we were bold enough to say…

    Reply

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